Pythian Games

put on your track shoes and write the miles

Opening Lockfast Places

with 13 comments

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Rodney (1)

First voyage
Male convicts on board
Departure Port: Portland (Dorset) Departure Date: 23 Aug 1850
Arrival Port: Hobart Arrival Date: 28 Nov 1850

Convicts landed: 308

Died on board:
GILL John
MURPHY George
SPEAKMAN Thomas

Sources:
Archives Office of Tasmania, Guide to Convict Records by Ship Reference.
Bateson, Charles, The Convict Ships 1787-1868, Brown, Son & Ferguson Ltd 1985.
Broxam, Graeme, Shipping Arrivals and Departures, Tasmania, 1843-1850, Roebuck, 1998, p227.
Phillips, Margaret E., Australian Joint Copying Project, Handbook Part 7, Public Records Office Admiralty Records, National Library of Australia 1993, pp 75-77.
Archives Office of Tasmania, Convict Department, Registers of Convict’s Deaths, 10 Jun 1840-31 Mar 1846, 25 Nov 1845-5 Jul 1874, (Ref: CON 63).

Convicts on board listed by Researchers

ALLEN Charles
BARKER Samuel
BERRYMAN Charles
BROWN William
CAMERON John
EXALL Joseph
GOLD Hugh
GOODWIN Joseph aka STEWART
RANDALL William
RITCHIE David
ROBSON John Boyd
SPACKMAN James
STEWART Joseph aka GOODWIN
WADE William
WARE Charles
WINWOOD Levi

Non-convicts on board listed by Researchers

MATTHEWS Joseph & Sarah – Military Pensioner
TYNAN Andrew – Military Pensioner
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I sit looking at the jigsaw pieces
Studying them
Seeing how they will fit together
To form an impression
make whole
the broken mold
From which I sprang
I am the one
Who carries on the tradition of
Opening Lockfast Places
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13 Responses

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  1. Heather love,
    This is way cool!! This is the sort of thing I wish I knew about my family. Thank you so much for sharing this puzzle piece with us. now I am much more comfortable about revealing some of my antecedents.

    Hugs and Kisses,
    GwenGuin

    gwenguin1

    March 22, 2008 at 7:26 am

  2. I am smiling very broadly Gwen. When you meet me in person you will know that good old bawdy, Scottish, convict blood is coursing through my veins along with a host of other bits that are equally fascinating. I could have been a character from Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. Feel empowered to show us who you are.

    Heather Blakey

    March 22, 2008 at 7:29 am

  3. And incidentally! You can expect to see quite a few jigsaw pieces flung on to the table, to mull over and try to form in to some sort of picture.

    Heather Blakey

    March 22, 2008 at 7:32 am

  4. Join Jim’s club–how interesting to be able to trace to the Tasmanian convicts.
    Happy history searching. Fran

    Fran

    March 22, 2008 at 9:12 am

  5. Awesome. Don’t you love looking at this stuff? You can’t help but start seeing them in your mind and start asking questions about them. What were they like? Why would a judge send teenagers so far away for petty theft? What was it like when they arrived? How did Mary and Joseph fall in love? And..the 10 kids!!!!

    Thanks for posting this.

    Lori

    March 22, 2008 at 11:36 am

  6. Wonder what the real story behind the story is??

    imogen88

    March 22, 2008 at 11:59 am

  7. Heather, you are still opening lockfast places, in the family tradition – but now through inspiring us & all your students to look within to find the goods they really want/need, write and open up. You’ve given back way more than an umbrella some ancestor borrowed!!

    kvwordsmith

    March 22, 2008 at 1:47 pm

  8. Wow! Documentation — what a delicious puzzle!

    espirit07

    March 22, 2008 at 2:19 pm

  9. This is absolutely fascinating stuff. You are so lucky to have all this information. I wish I knew more about where I came from and who my ancestors were. My mother would never talk about it so I have no leads, except what I remember from when I was a small child, and that’s not much. It was as if my mother was ashamed, but why? Guess I’ll never know.

    Vi

    woodnymph

    March 22, 2008 at 3:23 pm

  10. This is really neat, Heather! What a wonderful resource to find. Things like this make ancestors more real, don’t they! Thank you so much for sharing this.

    shewolfy728

    March 22, 2008 at 3:32 pm

  11. Ahhh…so that is where you get your fascination with opening doors and hidden entryways. I’ve no doubt it is in fact a predisposed deliciously wicked sort of curiousity and rebellion mixed in the most beautiful way. So glad to have you for our very ownest, Heather, AKA Enchenteur, AKA….ohhhh what a long list of aliases. Too many to mention.

    It’s wonderful.

    Steph

    stephanie

    March 22, 2008 at 4:05 pm

  12. I just LOVED reading all these responses. What a joy. It does explain the, irreverence, rebellion and aliases Steph đŸ™‚ To have such a treasure appear, seemingly from nowhere (a distant cousin did all the research) is a priceless gift. Up until now I knew most about my maternal history. Now the picture is becoming so much clearer.

    Heather Blakey

    March 22, 2008 at 10:14 pm

    • Hi Heather,
      It is Sheryl your distant cousin. Have you researched further with our convict past? I have the trial papers for joseph, would you like a copy. I can see you have enjoyed your research as much as I have.
      Cheers for now
      Sheryl

      Sheryl

      January 20, 2014 at 8:15 am


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